An unapologetic plant geek shares advice and opinions on gardening, the contrived and the natural landscape, as well as occasional topics from the other side of the gate.

February 26, 2017

I Love Chanticleer, Again

     Last October, I found myself falling in love with Chanticleer all over again. This was my fourth visit, and I am not going to say it was my favorite visit, because I would also say that about trips 1, 2, and 3. This was, however, my first time in the rain, though not visit-cancelling rain. It was sporadic enough to just keep your umbrella handy, but not always open, and light enough to enhance photography - and I took a lot of photos, so I'd recommend loading up your pixel hopper before going any further.

     Front Entrance
Chanticleer Entrance (1)

     One of my favorite spots at Chanticleer is always the Teacup Garden, and I like that the gardeners get to change it from year to year. This fall the colors seemed sullen, in an attractive way. I was really smitten with how the raindrops beaded on the Euphorbia cotinifolia, and how the variegated Asclepias curassavica played so well with the grass, which I think was Nassella tenuissima. 
Chanticleer Teacup Garden (1)

Chanticleer Teacup Garden (6)

Chanticleer Teacup Garden (3)

Chanticleer Teacup Garden (5)

     Not sullen, the Cutting Garden was full of color, and being late in the season it towered over our heads.
Chanticleer Cut Flower Garden (1)

Chanticleer Cut Flower Garden (3)

Chanticleer Cut Flower Garden (5)

     Ruin Garden
Chanticleer The Ruins (1)

     Gravel Garden
Chanticleer Gravel Garden (1)

Chanticleer Gravel Garden (2)

Chanticleer (34)

     Salvia 'Limelight'
Chanticleer Salvia 'Limelight'

     Colchicum
Chanticleer Colchicum (2)

Chanticleer Colchicum

     Chanticleer House Garden
Chanticleer House Garden (1)

Chanticleer House Garden (2)

Chanticleer House Garden (3)

Chanticleer House Garden (6)

Chanticleer House Garden (7)

Chanticleer House Garden (10)

     This terrace sits at one end of Chanticleer House, and overlooks a large lawn and the gardens beyond. As a gardener, I can imagine ending my day sitting here watching the day turn to dusk, cool drink in hand.
Chanticleer House Garden (11)

     If you would like to see the remainder of my photos from this trip, please visit my Flickr page, and you can also see previous Chanticleer blog posts from 2016 here, and from 2011 here. Currently I am hosting my annual Winter Walk-Off, and I invite all of my fellow bloggers to participate.

21 comments:

  1. I am making my first ever visit to Chanticleer this June as a prequel to Garden Bloggers Fling. I am so excited to visit a garden that's been on my punch list for years. Thanks for the beautiful photos !

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    1. Me jealous. Take LOTS of photos!

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    2. I love the idea of a fling prequel, maybe it could be called a prefling.

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  2. Gorgeous! Thank you for the tour. What a great time of year to go.

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    1. This was my second fall trip, and yes it was a good time to go. Many of their more tropical plants are still out, and have reached a good size before having to be brought in or let go.

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  3. Thank you, Les! I planned to visit Chanticleer last summer while traveling to Pennsylvania, but it didn't work. Thanks to your beautiful pictures, I am enjoying this outstanding garden now. Thanks again!

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    1. You are quite welcome. I do hope you will be able to make it one day.

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  4. I was startled at first by all the foliage and color, and then realized this visit took place last October, so this is a pre-winter garden. I read it's closed till March; it would be interesting to see it's winter, bare-bones statement.
    I'm enamored by the Colchicum in the grass. Do they not mow till it's done blooming?

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    1. I don't know for sure, but I think they allow the grass to grow while the Colchicum do their thing.

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  5. Wonderful look at Chanticleer -- on my garden-visit bucket list!

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    1. Definitely a bucket list item!

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  6. Still on my wish list of gardens to visit. Your photos are spectacular!

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    1. Thank you Phillip. It is a not-to-be-missed garden.

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  7. Wow, wow, wow...I almost didn't get by the first picture as I couldn't stop looking at the detail in that fabulous container design but every one was equally stunning. I'm also visiting the garden in June with some garden friends just before the Fling. It will be my second visit. Can't wait!

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    1. Yes, they know how to plant a container. It is impossible to leave Chanticleer without being inspired.

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  8. Wow! Wow! The cutting garden is spectacular.

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  9. I am a big fan of Chanticleer, too, Les. It is a very inspiring garden for many reasons: innovative design, extraordinary plantings and exuberant creativity everywhere you go. As an aging gardener, my favorite thing about Chanticleer is that it is a terrific training ground for burgeoning horticulturists.

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    1. As an aging gardener, I like that is easy to see nearly all of it without having to backtrack, and its beauty is a good distraction from the aches in my knee.

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