An unapologetic plant geek shares advice and opinions on gardening, the contrived and the natural landscape, as well as occasional topics from the other side of the gate.

November 12, 2009

Island Living

Things are a little wet and windy here today. We are in the grips of a powerful Nor'easter with lots of wind, rain and tidal flooding. Many of the areas roads, bridges and tunnels are closed effectively turning Hampton Roads into a collection of islands. Because of the strong northeasterly winds, the waters back up into the area creeks and rivers and don't get an opportunity to empty at low tide, and consquently high tide is magnified. These pictures are from my neighborhood at the end of this morning's high tide - the worst flooding is predicted this afternoon.

New Hampshire Ave. 1

Mayflower and Newport 1

Mayflower and Newport 2

Knitting Mill Creek 5

Knitting Mill Creek 1

Knitting Mill Creek 4

24 comments:

  1. Good grief! Stay dry and start that ark!!

    Love being reminded about XTC and World Party through your playlist . . .

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  2. Oh my, Les. Stay safe! and as for the blue cheese, we'll save some for you. ;)

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  3. I remember these nor'easters very well...I used to live down in the Wythe neighborhood of Hampton. But now I'm high and dry up in the 'burg. Be careful where you drive!

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  4. OMG! I hope you all fare well as this could be bad judging by the pictures.

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  5. Great pictures. I like the one of the street lights lined up and all lit.
    Our water was going down and now is going back up, 20 minutes to low tide.
    The garage is toast for sure.
    Stay safe walking around in the water. With these winds and wet soils the trees are dangerous.

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  6. Oh, dear! I do hope your house stays dry and the damage to your island is limited. Such dramatic photos! There is something so beautifully evocative in those flooded street lamps, despite the horrible destruction.

    I survived No Name on Nantucket Island, wading out neck high. It was not pretty.

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  7. Good heavens, I hope your house and garden aren't underwater.

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  8. Oh my! This looks pretty bad. I hope your house is safe. The rain and wind is not stopping up here either, but at least no flooding yet.

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  9. How many of the houses got water in them?

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  10. Eight or more inches in the garage, no phones, but still have internet. Go figure. Lost the freezer and one rain barrel went floating out to sea.

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  11. Wow. Wow. and Wow! I've heard how bad it is but didn't realize it was like that where you are! I hope you won't have damage! And that your house is still on dry ground...no leaky doors, windows, roofs...ugh. My daughter at CNU hasn't said much other than some kids there are shimming, and her classes have been cancelled. Geez. Take care;-)

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  12. As we watch the weather channel and local reports, it seems you are still in the throes of heavy rains. I do hope your own abode is safe, but from the looks of your neighborhood, fear the worst. Stay safe, my friend.

    Frances

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  13. I was wondering how you faired over in your neck of the woods. That is alot of water!!! I don't have any complaints since I live in an area that doesn't typically flood when we get substantial rains. Two blocks over it's another story though. Just a boggy yard, leaf debris, and dead limbs to contend with here.

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  14. Hope you got through it all ok Tidewater Gardener. Your pictures are pretty incredible.

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  15. Thanks for all your thoughts and comments. I just got power on after two days without, using a borrowed generator and pump to empty the basement. The city and the neigborhood are huge messes. The storm started Wed. and did not leave until Sat. The word "battered" is not cliched at this point.

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  16. Geez, I thought you guys would be bad - but I didn't think you'd be this bad!! I've been so pre-occupied the past few days that I hadn't checked in - I knew you guys were getting alot of rain, but this is pretty bad. Glad that you had electricity back on (and hopefully the water was only in your basement?) - we'll looking forward to hearing how your garden fared, and hang in there. Better yet, go drink a beer - I'm guessing you deserve one! (How did the dogs handle all of those days of rain and high water?)

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  17. I pray things will soon be back to normal.

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  18. Oh gosh ... I am just back from Cape Cod where there were high winds and incredible surf. I sure hope this is the worst of the flooding! I see this post was made Thursday so hope all is well... that you have power et al... OOPS... I just read over the comments and saw yours... glad to read you are OK and power back on. It must be very hard to have to deal with flooding. Hope you did not have too much damage. ps those yellow berries are actually crabapples. Take Care. Carol

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  19. Bummer... I saw the casualties in your Flickr stream and came right over. Well, you took some really nice pictures of this calamity! :)

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  20. Pam,
    The dog did OK, even storm-phobic Loretta. She only got noticably upset when the transformers started blowing. All three had to be pushed outside when it came time to do their business, but between rains there was time for walks.

    MNG,
    Thanks for your prayers.

    Carol,
    Thanks for stopping by, and thanks for the ID on the Crabapple, that was my first guess.

    Chuck,
    Everyone loves a good calamity. Thanks for stopping by.

    Les

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  21. My lord. How does anyone have a dry basement? I'll take my 1-3" of snow any day over that. Viva middle of nowhere, usa.

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  22. Wow.

    Hope that nice canoe didn't float away.

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  23. Ben,
    The coast is a dynamic place to live, but as you alluded to, not without its problems.

    Susan,
    I could not tell if it floated there from somewhere else or came out of one my neighbor's backyard. Later I noticed it tethered to the fence at one of the flooded houses - either as escape vehicle or consolation prize for a flooded 1st floor.

    Les

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